Filling Up The Creative Well

​It really is true what Julia Cameron says in The Artist’s Way. If you do not regularly replenish your creative well, then your creative juices will ‘dry up’ and you will stagnate. Even if you seem to be on a roll, your project will skid to a halt because you’ve burned up all of your available resources!

What Julie Cameron suggests in her book is going on something called an ‘artist’s date’, in which one devotes some time to replenishing this dried-up well with fresh inspiration and ideas. This might involve going to the local art gallery, reading a book or even going to a new restaurant and doing some people-watching! You are meant to do this completely alone so that you can fully absorb the experience.

This week, for example, I wrote lots of nursery rhymes and nonsense poetry after devouring a collection of classical nursery rhymes in one sitting! On other occasions, looking at statues or taking a stroll through the park has triggered something within me. It does not matter what you do to fill your creative well, as all art is birthed from the same creative energy that flows through us all. 

I too have had sudden droughts while writing, especially when I’ve written a lot in a short space of time. While I believe that any of us can tap into the abundant energies of the cosmos, it is important to realise that we must be proactive in exposing ourselves to life’s wonders (a beautiful piece of artwork, trees rustling in the wind, a new exciting experience etc), which act as portals to that creative energy which you seek. Make sure that you take regular “culture baths” and always be open to new inspiration and experiences to fuel your creative projects!

Good luck, my fellow creators! And much love =)

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Finding Your Creative Voice

In recent months, my thinking has been very scattered and I’ve been allowing myself to get wrapped up in all kinds of things that aren’t really that important. This has worn me down, spread me thin, left no space for my creativity to emerge. Indeed, my creative voice has been submerged beneath an ocean of miscellaneous crap, completely drowned out and distorted.

Nurturing your creative voice is so important for an artist. Without it, you feel as though your wings have been clipped. No matter how hard you try, you just cannot take flight for long. This can be very frustrating, especially when you have a story to tell or something to express, but the only thing you can do is work through this challenging period.

My biggest problem is that I don’t devote enough time to my writing. Instead, my energies are channeled into mundane things and not being spent on my one true passion. At the moment, though, I am going through a massive de-cluttering – physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually – and I am finding that as I peel away the layers of dead-weight, I am rediscovering what my priorities are.

As all the crap is being banished from my life, I have been able to devote more time and energy to the things that I love. Already, I have noticed that my mind is clearer and more focused, less concerned with silly trivial things (such as what my work colleagues think about me). I still have some way to go, but hopefully once I am fully unburdened, my creative energies will be able to spring forth unhindered.

Slow Down And Enjoy Right Now

Many of us get caught up in the race of life, trying to get ahead, forever striving to reach our goals and feeling guilty when we’re not pushing forward. But there is nothing wrong with slowing down and enjoying life’s simple pleasures.

Why do we kill ourselves in the pursuit of success? Why do we insist on flogging our horse when it needs to rest? Why do we buy into the insane expectations that society thrusts upon us?

By all means, reach for the stars, but don’t lose yourself in the process. “It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live,” Albus Dumbledore wisely said. And quite right he is, for there is much joy to be found in the everyday. Yes, you may wish to travel the world or set up a business or learn how to play the guitar, but you may find joy in the little things, such as eating a tasty sandwich or meeting up with an old friend.

This week, I have made the conscious effort to take some time out and recharge my batteries, as I am definitely guilty for pushing myself too hard. But I know I’m not alone with this and so I wanted to remind others to relax and laugh and play.

Don’t spread yourself too thin! Focus your energies on things that really sing to your heart. Do you really need that new iPhone or fast car or a perfect body? Do you really need to do everything on your bucket list? At the end of the day, we are only human and there’s only so much that we can do in one lifetime, so you can’t expect to do it all and see it all. I shall leave you all with a poem I wrote, called A Race Against The Clock, which I think sums up the madness of our go-getter society:

I need to go somewhere,
Do something,
Be someone.
Stay young,
Party hard,
Have fun.

I want to learn a language,
Climb a mountain,
Play the guitar.
See the world,
Get rich,
Drive a fast car.

I want to fit in,
Yet stand out.
Have a relationship,
Yet sleep around.
I want a career,
But I’d like to be free.
I try so hard to be
Cool and trendy.

I want to live abroad,
Start a business,
Keep fit.
Volunteer,
Skydive,
Watch the sun set.

There’s so many things I want to do,
Keeping up with what’s new.
I’d like to have a family one day,
But first I’d just like to play.
A race against the clock,
Tick tock – tick tock…

 

 

The Importance of Having a Writing Space

The saddest part about moving house was saying goodbye to my dear writing desk.

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It was the place where I wrote three books and spent many hours of my life. I developed a very special connection with the corner of that room and instantly felt at peace and ready to create whenever I entered that space. But all good things must come to an end eventually…

In all honesty, I was ready to move on. Life in that stuffy flat had stagnated and fell to ruin, so I was extremely grateful for the opportunity to start afresh. The writing desk was the only thing I was sad about leaving behind, but I have now set up writing desk in my new house and began working on my fourth book!

I think that it is very important to have a designated writing space. Psychologically, it helps you to get into the zone more quickly. I am still waiting to develop a special connection with my new writing space, but I think that we will forge that bond through writing. As I give birth to my latest story, my writing desk will come alive with creative energy, which in turn will help to spur me on even further.