Filling Up The Creative Well

​It really is true what Julia Cameron says in The Artist’s Way. If you do not regularly replenish your creative well, then your creative juices will ‘dry up’ and you will stagnate. Even if you seem to be on a roll, your project will skid to a halt because you’ve burned up all of your available resources!

What Julie Cameron suggests in her book is going on something called an ‘artist’s date’, in which one devotes some time to replenishing this dried-up well with fresh inspiration and ideas. This might involve going to the local art gallery, reading a book or even going to a new restaurant and doing some people-watching! You are meant to do this completely alone so that you can fully absorb the experience.

This week, for example, I wrote lots of nursery rhymes and nonsense poetry after devouring a collection of classical nursery rhymes in one sitting! On other occasions, looking at statues or taking a stroll through the park has triggered something within me. It does not matter what you do to fill your creative well, as all art is birthed from the same creative energy that flows through us all. 

I too have had sudden droughts while writing, especially when I’ve written a lot in a short space of time. While I believe that any of us can tap into the abundant energies of the cosmos, it is important to realise that we must be proactive in exposing ourselves to life’s wonders (a beautiful piece of artwork, trees rustling in the wind, a new exciting experience etc), which act as portals to that creative energy which you seek. Make sure that you take regular “culture baths” and always be open to new inspiration and experiences to fuel your creative projects!

Good luck, my fellow creators! And much love =)

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Losing Your Creative Ability

Recently, I watched Kiki’s Delivery Service, an animated film about a witch-in-training. Aside from being a charming and highly original story (as most Studio Ghibli films tend to be), there was some very useful advice for creative people, imparted by Ursula, a really cool artist who lived in a log cabin in the woods. Here is what she says to Kiki, the young witch who has recently lost her ability to fly:

Ursula: Painting and magical powers seem very much the same. Sometimes I’m unable to paint a thing.

Kiki: You mean it? Then what? What happens?

Ursula: Kiki, please don’t move. It’s hard to draw a moving target.

Kiki: Without even thinking about it, I used to be able to fly. Now I’m trying to look inside myself to find out how I did it. But I just can’t figure it out.

Ursula: You know, could be you’re working at it too hard. Maybe you should just take a break.

Kiki: Yeah, but still if I can’t fly …

Ursula: Then stop trying. Take long walks. Look at the scenery. Doze off at noon. Don’t even think about flying. And then, pretty soon you’ll be flying again.

Kiki: You think my problems will …

Ursula: Go away? That’s right. It’s going to be fine. I promise.

[A few hours pass by]

Ursula: When I was your age, I’d already decided to become an artist. I loved to paint so much. I’d paint all day until I fell asleep right at my easel. And then one day, for some reason, I just couldn’t paint anymore. I tried and tried, but nothing I did seemed any good. They were copies of paintings I’d seen somewhere before … and not very good copies either. I just felt like I’d lost my ability.

Kiki: That sounds like me.

Ursula: It’s exactly the same, but then I found the answer. You see, I hadn’t figured out what or why I wanted to paint. I had to discover my own style. When you fly, you rely on what’s inside of you, don’t you?

Kiki: Uh-huh. We fly with our spirit.

Ursula: Trusting your spirit! Yes, yes! That’s exactly what I’m talking about. That same spirit is what makes me paint and makes your friend bake. But we each need to find our own inspiration, Kiki. Sometimes it’s not easy.

Kiki: I guess I never gave much thought to why I wanted to do this. I got so caught up in all the training and stuff. Maybe I have to find my own inspiration.

This scene in the film spoke absolute volumes to me. Until a few days ago, I too had lost my creative spark and it is so frustrating to lose that natural flow, but there are usually reasons as to why it has happened, such as pushing yourself too hard or losing belief in yourself. It feels as though your connection to the cosmic radio station has gone faulty and you can no longer tune in properly, having to put in so much effort to produce something that once came so naturally to you.

But the advice in Kiki’s Delivery Service reminded me that we all get creative blockages and the best way to combat them is to take a break, switch off and relax. Such creative droughts are not the end of the world and I have certainly bounced back from such situations before, though it can feel like you’ve lost your creative talent forever. Indeed, you could not be blamed for fearing this, but take it from me: once your spirit has been lifted and the blockage removed, you will soar once again.

Trust me, I’m a writer.